Rated Strong by Weiss Ratings and
4-Star Excellent by BauerFinancial, Inc.

ORANGE COUNTY TRUST COMPANY

Highly Capitalized, Strong and Solid -
Your Local Community Bank.

Scam Alerts & Phishing/Spoofing

Fraudulent E-Mails

We recognize how important it is to protect your identity from unlawful use, and shield your accounts from fraud and unauthorized access. With this in mind, you can be assured that it is not our practice to:

  • Send E-Mail that requires you to enter personal information directly into the E-Mail.
  • Send E-Mail threatening to close your account if you do not take the immediate action of providing personal information.
  • Send E-Mail asking you to reply by sending personal information.
  • Share your name with any contacts outside our firm in a manner inconsistent with our Privacy Policy.

Please exercise caution when reading E-Mail that may appear to have been sent by us. It's an unfortunate reality that criminals continue to devise ways to exploit technology in an effort to rip you off. One increasingly common scam is called "phishing" (pronounced "fishing"), where your personal information is the "catch of the day". They may even direct you to a web site they have set up that appears to be the bank's web site, for purposes of illegally collecting sensitive user information. Orange County Trust Company will never ask for sensitive information in this manner.

Be aware of email scams

Along with eCards containing viruses, phishing and spear phishing scams claiming to be from the IRS, Better Business Bureau, Fedex, the lottery, police agencies, and many others are showing up in the wild. These scams run year-round. Be aware that the criminal trend is not to target banks directly, but to target the customer base and have the customer compromise their bank, without knowing what is happening.

Report any suspicious E-Mail to support@orangecountytrust.com

Safeguard Your Information

  • Shred financial documents, pre-approvals, pre-selected credit card offers, receipts and any paperwork with personal information before you discard them.
  • Protect your Social Security number. Don't carry your Social Security card in your wallet or write your Social Security number on a check.
  • Don't give out personal information on the phone, through the mail, or over the Internet unless you have initiated the contact and know who you are dealing with.
  • Never click on links sent in unsolicited emails.
  • Don't use an obvious password like your birth date, your mother's maiden name, or the last four digits of your Social Security number.
  • Keep your personal information in a secure place at home, especially if you have roommates, employ outside help, or are having work done in your house.
  • Never use your mailbox for outgoing mail.
  • Account for all new checkbooks when you receive a new order in the mail.
  • Be aware of your surroundings when using an ATM. Block your transaction with your body.
  • Memorize your passwords and PIN numbers. Do Not carry them with you.
  • Obtain a free copy of your credit report annually to review and monitor your history at, annualcreditreport.com, the only official site recommended by the Federal Trade Commission.

What to do if you are a victim

As soon as you suspect a problem, contact your financial institution and credit card company to close your accounts. File a Police report and obtain a copy of the report. Contact the Federal Trade Commission theft hotline 1-877-438-4338 and the Social Security Fraud hotline 1-800-269-0271. Place a "Fraud Alert" on your credit reports, and review the reports carefully. The alert tells creditors to follow certain procedures before they can open new accounts in your name or make certain changes to your existing accounts. The three nationwide credit reporting companies have toll-free numbers for placing an initial 90-day fraud alert; a call to one company is sufficient:

  • Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
  • Experian: 1-888-Experian (397-3742)
  • Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289

Placing a fraud alert entitles you to free copies of your credit reports. Look for inquiries from companies you haven't contacted, accounts you didn't open, and debts on your accounts that you can't explain.